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ABOUT US

OUR EXPECTATIONS

“The men and women of West Thurston Regional Fire Authority take pride in our effort to outperform our customers’ expectations. We are committed to a high level of readiness and preparation for the uncertainties of emergency response.”   

“We believe you expect timely arrival of appropriately staffed and equipped fire department units to the emergency scene. Upon arrival you expect well trained first responders to safely, efficiently and effectively do their best to save lives, reduce suffering and protect property.”

 

 

WHO ARE WE

West Thurston Regional Fire Authority is located just south of Olympia, Washington.  The 158 square mile response zone stretches approximately 12 miles east and west along Interstate Five from the city limits of Tumwater to the Lewis County Line. The RFA began from the partnership between Thurston County Fire District 1 and Thurston County Fire District 11.  The goal of the partnership was to maximize efficiencies and improve service delivery to the citizens of the region.  The successful partnership created the fourth Regional Fire Authority (RFA) in the state of Washington.

 

West Thurston RFA delivers comprehensive emergency services including Fire Protection, Rescue and Emergency Medical Services and Patient Transport. The Regional Fire Authority serves approximately 30,000 residents in the communities of Bordeaux, Delphi, Gate, Grand Mound, Littlerock, Maytown, Michigan Hill, Rochester and Scott Lake. The diverse service area includes industrial, commercial, residential, and forest land.

The Regional Fire Authority delivers exceptional service with state-of-the art fire, rescue and emergency medical apparatus and equipment through 75 exceptional professionals both career and volunteer. Our proud professionals respond to approximately three thousand (3,000) emergency 911 service calls each year.

OUR MISSION

It shall be the mission of West Thurston Regional Fire Authority to develop, operate and manage resources granted by the people of the region to preserve lives and property in our communities by providing services directed toward prevention, management and mitigation of fire, emergency medical, rescue, and disaster incidents.​

WTRFA
COURAGE
COMMUNITY
COMMITMENT

OUR SERVICE AREA

West Thurston Regional Fire Authority is located just south of Olympia, Washington.  The 158 square mile response zone stretches approximately 12 miles east and west along Interstate Five from the city limits of Tumwater to the Lewis County Line. The RFA began from the partnership between Thurston County Fire District 1 and Thurston County Fire District 11.  The goal of the partnership was to maximize efficiencies and improve service delivery to the citizens of the region.  The successful partnership created the fourth Regional Fire Authority (RFA) in the state of Washington.

Population is on the increase in our area with a great influx of residential new construction over the last few years. Some developments and subdivision at a glance have the appearance of our district being suburban, but simply driving a mile in any direction one could find themselves in rural and wilderness area. With our District covering hills and forested area, our district has many homes located within the wildland/urban interface which create many challenges for fire protection. There are many areas of the district that have homes that are in a limited water supply area or limited access.

Interstate 5 and SR 12 are our major transportation thoroughfares and locations for many of our responses. Major secondary arterials include Old Hwy 99, Sargent Rd., 183rd Ave. and Littlerock Rd. The Puget Sound and Pacific Railroad’s main line runs through the district and serves local industries. The major roadways and rail line are an identified concern due to the transport of hazardous materials and radiological/nuclear material. The major concern for the district with respect to transportation incidents is hazardous materials, mass casualty scenes, and motor vehicle accident rescue.

There are many other locations that are retail, gas stations, convenience stores, repair and rebuilding facilities, agricultural, dairy, and in home businesses. Over the past few years, the construction and opening of the Great Wolf Lodge and its surrounding infrastructure created an increase of call volume for our responders. The business sector of the district has continued to grow over the past. The new influx of residential has started to bring with it the associated businesses that will support the new population. Businesses include Briarwood Farms who have 3 sites in the District, Weyerhaeuser Company who has a tree farm and nursery, two large propane storage facilities, and the Lucky Eagle Casino.

History

1850's

 

 

Early settlers came to the Littlerock area in the 1850’s. In 1854 the first road was slashed between Littlerock and Tumwater.

1920's

By 1925 a bustling town had developed. On June 27, 1925 the town of Littlerock was engulfed in fire, and the established Olympia firefighters had to be called to keep the fire from spreading further. The region experienced another massive fire, claiming the Maytown Mill, nine homes and ten bunk houses that were destroyed on July 29, 1925

1930'S

 

Fire was one of the most devastating disasters of the era. In an effort to improve public safety the State legislature provided for the formation of fire districts under title 52 RCW in 1939.

1940's

 

 

Thurston County Fire District #1 was formed by a vote of the people in 1947.

1950's

In August 1957, at the request of local citizens in the Littlerock area, a special election was held for the purpose of determining if Fire Protection District No. 11 should be formed. The ballots cast were 121 “yes” votes and 4 “no” votes. The first fire district commissioners (Alvey Morehouse, John Seed and Homer Hedgepeth) were also elected. When first established in 1957 the fire district was approximately 55 square miles (101 sq. mi. today). The 1936 ford was acquired in 1958 from the Kent Fire Department for $500 dollars.

1960's

 

 

Grand Mound Fire District (District #14) in 1964.

2000's

 

 

Thurston County Fire District #14 was merged into Fire District #1 in February 2002.

2010's

 

Thurston County Fire District #1 consolidates with Fire District #11 to become West Thurston Regional Fire Authority. Becoming the 4th Regional Fire Authority in Washington State.

SOUTH BATTALION

(ROCHESTER/GRAND MOUND)

 The current region of Fire District #1 encompassed the communities of Grand Mound and Rochester bordering Lewis County to the south and Grays Harbor to the west, protecting 66 square miles in the southwest region of the county with a population of about 16,000. The south battalion was known as a “bedroom community”, as many call the District home but work elsewhere.

The terrain of the area ranges from flat open valley, to river flood plains to the forested hills of the coastal range. The Chehalis and Black River run from east to west with many small minor tributaries to the Chehalis and Black Rivers including Scatter Creek and Prairie Creek.

The business sector of the district tremendous growth over the past 10 years. The new influx of residential properties has started to bring with it the associated businesses that will support the new population. Businesses include Briarwood Farms who have 3 sites in the District, Weyerhaeuser Company who has a tree farm and nursery, and many Chehalis Tribe, tribal trust land developments including, Great Wolf Lodge, Fairfield Inn & Suites, Lucky Eagle Casino & Hotel and numerous commercial properties along the I-5 (MP 88) - Old Hwy 99/ Hwy 12 interchage.


The diversity of our area can be easily seen by driving from one part of the district to the other. This diversity can be a challenge for our responders and how they operate to and on emergency scenes. Our district remains open-minded to changes to provide safety to the responders and citizens in our continually changing community.

NORTH BATTALION (LITTLEROCK FIRE STATION)

The names of the people responsible for the formation of the District are proudly memorialized on the plaque affixed to the engine. It took these special people (Harold Bade, Davie Brown, Homer Hedgepeth, Lloyd Jones, Alvey Morehouse, John Seed, Carlos Winkle) with the vision and commitment to sacrifice their personal finances by signing a bank loan to acquire the District’s first fire engine.

The firefighters who currently staff the firehouse have great admiration and gratitude for those who have served over the 50-year history of the Littlerock Fire Department. Today at the Headquarters Station on Littlerock Road you can see the first fire engine to serve in the District. The 1936 Ford stands proudly in the first apparatus bay as you enter the lobby. It is the story of the first fire engine acquisition that truly signifies the commitment, vision and sacrifices some very special public servants made to ensure public safety. The same personal sacrifices continue today with many of our volunteers who give freely of themselves to serve this larger ever-growing community.

While we proudly maintain the values that the Fire District was formed under, our focus is to maintain the fire district history and values. We understand that the residents of the district trust us to serve efficiently and effectively manage the resources that have been acquired by the residents of the district. We also understand that the decisions we make and what we plan for today, our children and grandchildren may inherit in the future. That humbling thought guides us to maintain the high level of service while focusing on building a fire department with the strength and depth necessary to sustain the rapidly changing community and the escalating call volume associated with that growth.

Station & Apparatus

The Regional Fire Service Authority serves approximately 30,000 residents in the communities of Bordeaux, Delphi, Gate, Grand Mound, Littlerock, Maytown, Michigan Hill, Rochester and Scott Lake. With five staffable stations, four stations are staffed 24/7  in the Rochester, Grandmound, Littlerock and Maytown areas, WTRFA  services a diverse area  that includes industrial, commercial, residential, and forest land.

 

Station1-1

Station1-1

95' Pierce Telesquirt

95' Pierce Telesquirt

Engine 1-1 - 2006 American LaFrance

Engine 1-1 - 2006 American LaFrance

Tender 1-1 - 2001 Kenworth - 2800 gallons

Tender 1-1 - 2001 Kenworth - 2800 gallons

Aid 1-1 - 2009 Dodge 4500 Type 1

Aid 1-1 - 2009 Dodge 4500 Type 1

Brush 1-1 - 2009 Dodge 4500 Wildland Type 6

Brush 1-1 - 2009 Dodge 4500 Wildland Type 6

STATION 1-1
(GRAND MOUND)

ADDRESS: 18720 Sargent Rd SW, Rochester, WA 98579

PHONE: 360-273-5582

The Grand Mound Station serves as our operations headquarters in our Southern Battalion, housing both career and volunteer staff 24/7, 365 days a year. Covering the Grand Mound & Michigan Hill areas,  the station is responsible for the highest number of responses and one of the largest areas within our district. 

APPARATUS: Engine, Tender, Aid Unit, Brush Truck, Ladder Truck, & (Tumwater Fire Medic Units) 

station1-2

station1-2

Engine 1-2 - 2006 American LaFrance

Engine 1-2 - 2006 American LaFrance

2015-05-30 13.18.07

2015-05-30 13.18.07

Brush 1-2 - 2009 Dodge 5500 Wildland Type 6

Brush 1-2 - 2009 Dodge 5500 Wildland Type 6

Tender 1-2 - 2006 Kenworth - 2500gal

Tender 1-2 - 2006 Kenworth - 2500gal

20604335_1428813437207083_8076115364165520110_n

20604335_1428813437207083_8076115364165520110_n

STATION 1-2

(LITTLEROCK)

ADDRESS: 10828 Littlerock Rd, SW Olympia, WA 98512

PHONE: 360-352-1614

The Littlerock Station, originally District 11 (Littlerock Fire), serves as our administrative headquarters in our Northern Battalion, housing both career and volunteer staff 24/7, 365 days a year. Covering Littlerock, Scott Lake, Delphi, Bordeaux/Mima and a majority of the Capitol Forest, the Littlerock station has the second highest emergency call volume and is responsible for covering one of the largest areas within our district. 

APPARATUS: Engine, Tender, Aid Unit, Brush Truck

station1-3

station1-3

2015 Spartan Engine

2015 Spartan Engine

Brush 1-3 - 2001 Ford F550 Wildland Type 6

Brush 1-3 - 2001 Ford F550 Wildland Type 6

STATION 1-3

(ROCHESTER)

ADDRESS: 18346 Albany SW, Rochester, WA 98579

PHONE: 360-273-3593

The Rochester Station, originally District 1 (Rochester Fire),  houses both career and volunteer staff 24/7, 365 days a year, covering the Rochester, Michigan Hill, Gate and Grand Mound areas.

APPARATUS: Engine,  Aid Unit, Brush Truck

Scott_Lake_station_1-4_C

Scott_Lake_station_1-4_C

Engine 1-4 - 1995 Pierce

Engine 1-4 - 1995 Pierce

Aid 1-4 - 1995 Ford Type 3

Aid 1-4 - 1995 Ford Type 3

Green Machine

Green Machine

STATION 1-4

(SCOTT LAKE)

ADDRESS: 2640 Trevue Ave, SW Olympia, WA 98512

PHONE: 360-688-7280

The Scott Lake Station, a new addition to West Thurston Fire in 2015, serves as one of our volunteer/resident stations, covering the community of Scott Lake and the surrounding areas.

APPARATUS: Engine, Aid Unit

Station closed due to funding limitations

station1-6

station1-6

Engine 1-6 - 1995 H&W

Engine 1-6 - 1995 H&W

Aid 1-2 2009 Dodge 4500 Type 1

Aid 1-2 2009 Dodge 4500 Type 1

Rescue 1-6 - 2002 Ford F550

Rescue 1-6 - 2002 Ford F550

Fire Investigation Trailer

Fire Investigation Trailer

IMG_0798

IMG_0798

STATION 1-6

(MAYTOWN)

ADDRESS: 3131 Maytown Rd SW, Olympia, WA 98512

PHONE: 360-688-7280

The Maytown station houses both career and volunteer staff 24/7, 365 days a year in our central battalion. Covering the Maytown area, this station is responsible for the highest number of responses on Interstate 5 and includes a light industrial zone at I-5 (MP 95) and Millersylvania State Park.

APPARATUS: Engine, Aid Unit, Brush Truck

Fire Protection Rating

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WHAT THIS MEANS FOR YOU

"Residents and business owners will see savings in their property insurance premiums."

 

A recent evaluation and assessment by the Washington Survey and Rating Bureau (WSRB) of the fire departments fire stations, apparatus, staffing levels, and training/emergency service delivery capabilities resulted in a substantial rating improvement from a protection class PPC5 to PPC4.

 

Effective December 1st, 2018 West Thurston Regional Fire Authority’s new Public Protection Classification Rating will increase from 5 to 4. Thus, making West Thurston Fire rated the highest amongst any of the (non-city) fire departments in the region. For the second time in just over three years, West Thurston Fire has improved the communities’ fire protection rating which will translate to homes and business owners in the region saving money on their fire insurance premiums.   

PUBLIC PROTECTION CLASSIFICATION

How is the Public Protection Classification determined?

To determine the community's Public Protection Classification (PPC™), the Washington Surveying & Rating Bureau (WSRB) conducted a field survey, sending expert staff to visit the community and the agency to objectively observe and evaluate features of West Thurston Fire. Four major areas were evaluated including fire suppression capabilities, emergency communications systems, the community's water supply system, and the community’s risk reduction efforts. 

 

The fire suppression capabilities are rated based on the fire department's first-alarm response and initial attack to minimize potential loss. 

Washington Surveying & Rating Bureau (WSRB)

WSRB is the principal Washington-based source of property underwriting and rating information for the insurance industry.

West Thurston residents are advised to inform their insurance company of the improved rating. A letter from WSRB can be found below or on the home screen. If you have questions regarding the recent rating improvements you can contact Chief Rob Smith at (360)352-1614. 

Thank you for your support

Achieving a PPC4 rating is not easily accomplished, and it was through voter support to fund operational and administrative improvements that has resulted in the success of WTRFA’s re-rating. In a 158 square mile (primarily rural) region, it was estimated that WTRFA is rated in the top 10% of all fire departments in the State and one of largest geographical regions achieving a rating of PPC4.

“We have been fortunate to have such great voter support for ballot propositions to increase staffing, build or remodel fire stations, and replace older less reliable fire trucks. The residents have recognized that collectively they are a partnership that owns all of the fire stations and apparatus and they employ Firefighter/Rescue and Emergency Medical personnel to take care of the communities' emergency service needs.”

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